News

59http://www.theshlenkerschool.org/blog/2017/12/linking-the-generations-mikeitz-genesis-41-1
Linking the Generations - Mikeitz (Genesis 41:1 - 44:17)
12/14/2017 05:17 PM Posted by: David Cohen Poster Avatar
Mikeitz – After [Two Years] - Genesis 44:1:1−44:17
"At the end of two years’ time, Pharaoh had a dream …"

The True Miracle of Light:

Some would say that after everything Joseph went through in his life – being sold into slavery by his brothers, being imprisoned during his early days in Egypt – that to end up as an adviser to the Pharaoh was a miracle.  Some would say that to be able to re-unite with his brothers – and eventually his father – was also a miracle.  

This week’s Parasha, Mikeitz, has lessons for any family looking to examine their inner workings and trying to find models for reconciliation.  As with most of our stories, there is also trickery, pent up resentment, surprise, anger, and eventually joy.  With all of that, some would say it is also a miracle that we learn of the sons of Joseph, Menasseh and Ephraim - two brothers that our texts use as models for brotherly love.  To this day there are priestly benedictions that wish upon you the same love that existed between Menasseh and Ephraim, two people in the Torah known for getting along swimmingly well.  The contrast with the other brothers in this saga is remarkable.

It is fitting then that Chanukah – a time when we remember miracles and celebrate light – falls at the time of this Parasha.  In resources emailed home earlier this week, I provided a link to Rabbi Lawrence Hoffman’s piece on a new way to look at miracles during Chanukah.  The concept of the miracle of the oil lasting eight days was a fairly recent addition to our Chanukah commemoration; the rededication of the Temple and lighting the menorah were always at the core of the story.  So according to Hoffman, light itself is enough of a miracle - on its own merit.

He speaks of the light of warmth, peace, joy, happiness and freedom.  These are concepts even the youngest children can embrace.  For Hoffman, light represents hope, wisdom, and understanding: noble traits anyone would be proud to embrace.  

The light we know from science is the fastest element known to humankind.  According to Hoffman, even without the miracle of eight days – which our children will question us about when they get older - light gives us an almost unending array of special themes to focus on with our children - themes that are connected to Jewish values, themes that are all about attributes we want our children to cherish, and themes that can help them make the world a better place – today!


Additional Torah Study Resources:

Categorized under:  Torah
Blog Search

Categories

1Elementary Education
Elementary Education (43)
2Preschool
Preschool (36)
3Torah
Torah (25)

Archives

201809September3
September 2018 (3)
201808August2
August 2018 (2)
201805May4
May 2018 (4)
201804April4
April 2018 (4)
201803March4
March 2018 (4)
201802February4
February 2018 (4)
201801January3
January 2018 (3)
201712December3
December 2017 (3)
201704April1
April 2017 (1)
201703March1
March 2017 (1)
201702February2
February 2017 (2)
201701January1
January 2017 (1)
201604April1
April 2016 (1)
201505May1
May 2015 (1)
201503March1
March 2015 (1)
201502February1
February 2015 (1)
201501January1
January 2015 (1)
201412December2
December 2014 (2)
201409September1
September 2014 (1)
201408August1
August 2014 (1)
201405May2
May 2014 (2)
201312December1
December 2013 (1)
201310October3
October 2013 (3)
201308August1
August 2013 (1)
201305May3
May 2013 (3)
201304April4
April 2013 (4)
201303March10
March 2013 (10)
201212December1
December 2012 (1)
201210October1
October 2012 (1)
201209September2
September 2012 (2)
201109September1
September 2011 (1)
201103March1
March 2011 (1)
201101January1
January 2011 (1)
201012December1
December 2010 (1)
201011November1
November 2010 (1)
201010October2
October 2010 (2)
201009September2
September 2010 (2)
201008August2
August 2010 (2)
201007July1
July 2010 (1)